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Camp Out in Parks Canada’s Unique Tent Alternatives

Leave the tent at home and stay in one of Parks Canada's glamping options, from a water-droplet-shaped cabin in New Brunswick to a suspended cocoon in Nova Scotia.

Micro-Cube at Forillon National Park, Quebec

Photo: Parcs Canada - Éric Baril

Micro-Cube at Forillon National Park, Quebec

Stretching over nearly 245 square kilometres, Forillon National Park boasts soaring cliffs that overlook the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the Bay of Gaspé. The 100-square-foot micro-cube is a design-conscious camper’s dream. With its modern architecture (think sleek lines and floor-to-ceiling windows), double bed and patio, the “cube” offers the best way to experience Des-Rosiers Campground in style.


Goutte d’Ô at Fundy National Park, New Brunswick

Photo: Parcs Canada

Goutte d’Ô at Fundy National Park, New Brunswick

With a flashy blue exterior, this whimsical water droplet-shaped cabin pops against the surrounding forest’s greenery. The 64-square-foot space contains a blue sofa bed and a loft hammock accessible by a rope ladder and can accommodate a couple or a small family. While Goutte d’Ô is currently perched on a platform, the new cabins will be built on stilts or suspended in the air.


Teepees at Grassland National Park, Saskatchewan

Photo: Parcs Canada

Teepees at Grassland National Park, Saskatchewan

Step back in time with an overnight stay inside a First Nations teepee beneath the clear sky of the prairies’ Grassland National Park. Traditionally built out of animal skins, these portable shelters are now mostly made of white painted canvas. Parks Canada’s updated structures offer modern comfort, including an interior wooden platform, sleeping mats and Adirondack chairs. This campsite is the perfect home base to discover the area’s wildlife, cultural heritage and geological treasures. (Don’t miss the dinosaur bones in the East Block Badlands.)


Double-Tent at Riding Mountain National Park, Manitoba

Photo: Parcs Canada - Éric Beaudoin

Double-Tent at Riding Mountain National Park, Manitoba

Experience double the fun on your next camping adventure by spending a night in a tent within a tent. Located in Riding Mountain National Park’s Wasagaming Campground, this new accommodation consists of a small tent nestled inside a larger tent. Adorned with the image of a Plains bison – a sacred animal to the local Anishinabe people – the outer tent lets visitors enjoy the park’s natural beauty without being swarmed by bugs. The double-tent comes with a small bed, a table and two chairs.


O’Tentik at Gros Morne National Park, Newfoundland and Labrador

Photo: Parcs Canada - Éric Laflamme

O’Tentik at Gros Morne National Park, Newfoundland and Labrador

Punctuated by dramatic fjords, mountains, beaches and forests, Gros Morne National Park (a World Heritage Site) is a favourite among campers nationwide. O’Tentik is a cross between a cabin and a tent, thanks to its elevated wooden structure and canvas walls and roof. Equipped with three beds that can sleep up to six people, as wells as a table, chairs and a propane heating stove, this spacious accommodation takes the stress out of setting up camp. O’Tentik sites can be enjoyed at several national parks across Canada.


Cocoon Tree Bed at Cape Breton Highlands National Park, Nova Scotia

Photo: Parcs Canada

Cocoon Tree Bed at Cape Breton Highlands National Park, Nova Scotia

A magnet for hikers, Cape Breton Highlands National Park is home to the world-famous Cabot Trail. For some of the nation’s most scenic ocean vistas, book a night inside a spherical cocoon suspended six metres above the ground. Made of white canvas, the cocoon bed gently sways between the trees, giving visitors the feeling of sleeping in a hammock. A steep wooden staircase on Ingonish Beach leads to the entrance of the cocoon.


Yurts at Bruce Peninsula National Park, Ontario

Photo: Parcs Canada - Ethan Meleg

Yurts at Bruce Peninsula National Park, Ontario

Kick back in a traditional Central Asian dwelling on the shore of the crystal-clear Cyprus Lake at Bruce Peninsula National Park. Known as the original glamping tents, these yurts are fitted with a wood stove, a comfortable bed and a large deck. Enjoy the summer breeze through the windows and screen door after a day exploring the region’s iconic grotto. During the colder months, cozy up next to the wood fireplace inside the yurt.

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